Talks on The Gangs of Manchester

Andrew Davies gives talks about the gangs of Victorian Manchester and Salford at venues across Greater Manchester. Dates for 2014:

DAY OF THE DROOGS. A colloquium to mark the new Penguin Classics edition of A Clockwork Orange: Wednesday, 29 January, 6.30 p.m, Anthony Burgess Foundation, Manchester, M1 5BY.

Thursday Lates: Thursday 23 January, 7.00 p.m, Manchester City Art Gallery.

Manchester’s Original Gangsters

To read an article by Andrew Davies in response to David Cameron’s call for a ‘war’ on gangs, click here. ‘Manchester’s Original Gangsters’ appeared in the G2 section of the Guardian on 22 August 2011. The G2 cover that day featured none other than Dolly Parton.

A War on Gangs?

In the wake of David Cameron’s call for a ‘concerted all-out war on gangs,’ I was asked to offer a historical perspective for The World This Weekend on Radio 4. The programme is available on the BBC i-player for the next week, where the talk can be found 25 minutes into the programme. Here is the full text. The final paragraph, which comments on the antics of the Bullingdon club at Oxford University in 1894, did not feature in the BBC broadcast. I’ll try to be more succinct next time …

At the end of a week in which the Prime Minister declared a ‘war on gangs and gang culture,’ it’s worth pausing for a moment, and reflecting on the fact that we’ve been here before. Long before the phrase ‘Broken Britain’ had been invented, something remarkably close to present-day gang culture was manifested on the streets of Victorian Manchester. It was seen in Birmingham, Liverpool, London and Glasgow too, as the period from the 1870s to the 1890s witnessed recurring panics over what today we call knife-crime.

Then as now, young people were routinely demonized by politicians and sections of the press. The terminology differed, of course. Victorian gang members were labelled ruffians and brutes, barbarians and savages. But the rhetoric was used for many of the same purposes, not least to create the illusion that violence was new, and to deflect attention away from an unpalatable truth. Gangs and knife-crime have always been clustered in those parts of Britain’s cities characterized by poverty, unemployment and chronic levels of ill-health.

In nineteenth-century Manchester and Salford, youthful gang members called themselves scuttlers. Some of them were girls and young women, and lads and girls alike revelled in the notoriety afforded them by the press. A member of one of Salford’s gangs, John-Joseph Hillier, was dubbed the ‘King of the Scuttlers’ in newspaper headlines in 1894. For years afterwards, he wore a jersey with the title journalists gave him sewn onto the front.

Victorian attempts to explain the problems of gangs and knife-crime seem startlingly familiar to us. Where modern politicians blame American gangster rap, nineteenth-century commentators blamed bloodthirsty comics, known as ‘penny dreadfuls,’ and melodramatic productions at cheap theatres. Popular culture generates new forms of gang style, but these are surely adornments, not causes.

In the search for blame, Victorian parents were castigated too. As the Manchester Guardian lamented: ‘It was high time that parents should be taught their duty; at present they seem either regardless of this – or utterly afraid of punishing their children.’ It’s chastening to think that these words were written during an epidemic of knife-crime in the summer of 1890. Then, as now, the problem always seemed to lie with other people’s children.

The Victorians, like ourselves, found solutions to these problems hard to come by. Gangs seemed to be largely immune to prison as a deterrent, and flooding the affected districts with police, in anticipation of what we might call zero tolerance, only seemed to disperse violence from one area to another. In the search for a solution, Manchester and Salford led the way with the formation of working lads’ clubs. These new centres for education, training and recreation, established during the 1890s, were targeted at precisely those impoverished neighbourhoods most afflicted by gangs. It took a generation, and a significant commitment of both time and money to improve facilities for young people, but as the clubs grew, gangs declined. If this episode from our past is any guide, then working with – rather than against – young people will be our best way forward.

And finally, as we ponder the sentences meted out following the recent disturbances, we should bear in mind another lesson from the nineteenth century: that the punishment of young people has often been made to fit the person as much as the crime. While Manchester’s scuttlers received tough sentences from an unforgiving judiciary, the Lord-Justice General signed a letter to The Times in 1894 in defence of members of Bullingdon club, sent down from Oxford University following a drunken riot in Peckwater quad at Christ Church college. No looting was reported that night, but 500 panes of glass were smashed. In any other context, that would have constituted criminal damage. But then again, perhaps the line between youthful high jinks and mindless criminality is thinner than we care to admit.

Angels with Manky Faces

There will be a final, one-off performance of the play inspired by The Gangs of Manchester at the Dancehouse theatre in Manchester on Thursday, 15 July. Angels with Manky Faces will be performed by Manchester’s MaD Theatre Company.

Angels with Manky Faces played to packed houses at the Library Theatre and the Dancehouse in 2009. This additional performance is to raise money towards the production costs of MaD’s forthcoming play, Thai Brides and Teacakes.

Angels with Manky Faces features original film sequences set to classic Madchester songs, with cameos by members of The Smiths, the Inspiral Carpets, the Mock Turtles and Twisted Wheel. They appear alongside Manchester actors and DJs, including John Henshaw (Early Doors, Looking for Eric), Graeme Hawley (Coronation Street’s John Stape) and Terry Christian.

For further details, including ticket agencies, see the Dancehouse website.

For a sneak preview, click here for the trailer MaD made for Angels last year. In a new scene, specially written for the final performance, that bugger Bernie finally makes it onto the stage!

Gangs of Manchester walks from May 2010

Emma Fox will be leading monthly Gangs of Manchester walks from May 2010. Emma is an experienced Manchester tour guide and local history enthusiast. Her first six “scuttlers’ walks” all sold out. The dates of the forthcoming walks are:

Sunday, 29 August at 1pm
Sunday, 26 September at 1pm
Sunday, 31 October at 1pm
Thursday, 25 November at 10.30 am
Thursday, 27 January 2011, at 10.30 am
Sunday, 27 February 2011, at 1 pm
Tuesday, 29 March 2011, at 10.30 am
Saturday, 30 April 2011, at 1 pm.

The walk starts at outside Edwards Shoes, inside Barton Arcade, between St Ann’s Square and Deansgate, and lasts around two hours. It ends in the Marble Arch pub, where signed books will be available for purchase.

For further information call Emma Fox on 07500 774 200 or email showmemanchester@yahoo.co.uk.

To book your place on the walk, please go to http://www.quaytickets.com/?Venue=397
or call 0843 208 0500.

Click on the link below to see the flyer for the first walk:
Gangs of Manchester Flyer-1

Emma’s tour finishes at the Marble Arch on Rochdale Road: one of the locations for the film sequences for Angels with Manky Faces and a stone’s throw from the opening scene of The Gangs of Manchester.

New trailer for Angels with Manky Faces

You can view a new trailer for Angels with Manky Faces on youtube here. The trailer features members of MaD Theatre Company along with Graeme Hawley (Coronation Street), John Henshaw and Smug Roberts (Looking for Eric), Twisted Wheel, Mike Joyce (The Smiths), Martin Coogan (Mock Turtles), the Naughtys, Clint Boon (Inspiral Carpets), and Terry Christian. It’s set to Bye Bye Johnny’s song, King of the Scuttlers, and there’s even some artificial rain – in Manchester of all places! – courtesy of Greater Manchester Fire & Rescue Service.

Inside Out

The Gangs of Manchester is to be featured on BBC1 on Wednesday 18 February in the North-West edition of Inside Out.

Presenter Nigel Pivaro talks to author Andy Davies about the research that formed the basis of the book. Duncan Broady of Greater Manchester Police Museum describes the difficulties faced by police officers in attempting to quell scuttling affrays, and Leslie Holmes of Salford Lads’ and Girls’ Club discusses the role of the early lads’ clubs in combatting street violence.

The programme will include excerpts from films by Paul Cliff depicting scuttles in Angel Meadow. Appearing in the films are members of the MaD Theatre Company and junior supporters of FC United of Manchester. The final versions of these films will be shown in Angels with Manky Faces. The actors also appear in two historical reconstructions filmed by the BBC.

Are you Russell Brand?

The first of the three scheduled book signings took place at Waterstone’s at the Trafford Centre this afternoon. Thanks to Kate and the rest of the staff – and to everyone who bought a copy of the Gangs of Manchester. There will be a few scuttlers tumbling out of stockings around Manchester come Christmas morning. Thanks, too, to the woman who came over to the table to ask: “Are you Russell Brand?” She made my afternoon. I wasn’t Alan Titchmarsh, either – his signing was the previous day.

Next up: Waterstone’s in Manchester city centre (Deansgate branch), at two o’clock next Saturday, 22 November. Just don’t ask for J. K. Rowling. She’s the Saturday after.

Meet the Author

If you’re in the Manchester area during November and would like to meet the author of The Gangs of Manchester, come along to one of the following bookstore events:

Saturday, 15 November, 12.00: Waterstone’s, Trafford Centre

Saturday, 22 November, 2.00: Waterstone’s, Deansgate

DATE TO BE CONFIRMED: Borders, Cheetham Hill Road (Manchester Fort)

Andrew Davies will be signing copies of the book, and talking to readers about the scuttling gangs of Victorian Manchester and Salford.

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